Randle Kinswa: Sports Legend, Co-Editor, Small Town Boy

Randle+Kinswa%3A+Sports+Legend%2C+Co-Editor%2C+Small+Town+Boy

By Aiden Cook, Reporter

Randle Kinswa, above all else, is a man of privacy. While he is the co-manager and editor of The Easterner, not much else is truly known about him. 

Kinswa comes from the small town of Napavine, Washington. After living there for all of his life, he’s made it here to EWU to start his post-secondary education.

When he’s not working on school or writing, Kinswa is often focused on physical activity, to both sharpen the mind and the body. Lifting weights, going to the driving range or even a simple walk will often be his activity of choice. 

Kinswa has also been known to be a huge sports fanatic. While American football may be his favorite, he’d never turn down the chance to watch any other sports, especially when a team from Washington is representing them.

“I’m a big local guy,” said Kinswa. “Seahawks, Mariners, really any team that comes from Washington I’ll usually cheer for.”

Kinswa was also heavily involved in sports during high school, specifically football and basketball. Their football team was extremely successful, making it to state three times during his first three years. 

After joining The Easterner during the Fall quarter of 2019, Kinswa quickly rose through the ranks becoming the news editor and co-manger at the beginning of 2020-2021 school year. 

Even though he’s the co-manager and editor of The Easterner, Kinswa isn’t betting on a career in journalism. Instead, he’s majoring in political science, paving the way to law school.

“If you really want to understand functionalities and the system of government, you need a knowledge of journalism and media,” said Kinswa. “This along with political science opens up a lot of avenues.”

While Kinswa continues to work towards his goal of living a more free life, he insists that being hopeful and making the best of things will help you in the long-run. 

“I just hope we can work back towards how things were pre-covid,” said Kinswa. “Integrating people back into a classroom, into a community, integrating that type of energy back into people. That type of energy and relationship is really fractured, and I hope we can all work back towards it.”