Looking Back: “Educationally Oriented” Black Week Starts Monday

AARON DIXON, CAPTAIN OF SEATTLE'S chapter of the Black Panthers will speak here Monday in the Kennedy Library auditorium at 7:30 p.m. Spokane attorney Carl Maxey will speak at noon of the same day in Bali Lounge to launch Black Week.

AARON DIXON, CAPTAIN OF SEATTLE'S chapter of the Black Panthers will speak here Monday in the Kennedy Library auditorium at 7:30 p.m. Spokane attorney Carl Maxey will speak at noon of the same day in Bali Lounge to launch Black Week.

By Sheila Malloy, Staff Writer

This story was originally published in the Easterner, Vol. 19, No. 23, February 5, 1969 and has not been changed except for AP style.

Progress toward emancipation of the black man in America began with Abraham Lincoln’s Proclamation in 1863. It con­tinues through next week (and Lincoln’s Birthday) with lectures and discussions in Eastern’s ed­ucationally oriented Black Week. 

The white man’s education and understanding of the new and emerging role of the black man in the U.S. is the goal of the Black Student Union effort beginning Monday, accord_ing to BSU members. 

The week will feature such notable speakers as Congress­man Adam Clayton Powell, the controversial representative from Harlem and Rev. Jesse Jackson, Chicago minister responsible for placing several thousand Negroes in jobs in that area. 

Carl Maxey, influential attor­ney and black leader in Spo­kane, Roberta Byrd Barr, vice principal of Franklin High School in Seattle who has been instru­mental in speaking for National Educational Television’s “Black Journal” and poet Aaron Dixon, English major at University of Washington and captain of Seat­tle’s Black Panther Party will also speak. 

Black Week schedule also in­cludes an Afro-American fashion show, Morning Star Choir, and a panel discussion featuring Peter Kuria of Nigeria and the West Indian Association on “Foreign blacks in American society.”

The BSU will hold a forum at the end of the week and a dance is scheduled for Friday night.