The Easterner

Promoting sustainability at EWU

Erik+Budsberg+hosts+an+information+table+in+the+JFK+Library+for+the+Office+of+Sustainability+during+National+Food+Day+on+Oct.+24.++The+celebration+encouraged+students+to+eat+more+sustainable+diets%2C+and+showed+of+the+school%27s+efforts+to+reduce+its+environmental+impact.
Back to Article
Back to Article

Promoting sustainability at EWU

Erik Budsberg hosts an information table in the JFK Library for the Office of Sustainability during National Food Day on Oct. 24.  The celebration encouraged students to eat more sustainable diets, and showed of the school's efforts to reduce its environmental impact.

Erik Budsberg hosts an information table in the JFK Library for the Office of Sustainability during National Food Day on Oct. 24. The celebration encouraged students to eat more sustainable diets, and showed of the school's efforts to reduce its environmental impact.

Erik Rotness

Erik Budsberg hosts an information table in the JFK Library for the Office of Sustainability during National Food Day on Oct. 24. The celebration encouraged students to eat more sustainable diets, and showed of the school's efforts to reduce its environmental impact.

Erik Rotness

Erik Rotness

Erik Budsberg hosts an information table in the JFK Library for the Office of Sustainability during National Food Day on Oct. 24. The celebration encouraged students to eat more sustainable diets, and showed of the school's efforts to reduce its environmental impact.

By Amanda Haworth, Chief Copy Editor

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






Maintaining a sustainable environment is difficult, and while sporting a Hydro Flask and recycling are good starts, there is always something more that can be done.
Two organizations on campus are educating students on sustainability and encouraging them to make a difference: The Office of Sustainability and the EcoEagles club.

Office of Sustainability

The OOS is starting more events to engage students and encourage sustainability.
“We have a garden,” sophomore Kilei Motz, the event planner for the OOS said. “We used to grow food for Tawanka. Now we are kind of changing it up this quarter. We have a bunch of events; we have Sustainability Week, and we have Bike to Work Week next quarter, and we’re trying to do yoga in the garden and stuff like that. We’re just kind of setting that up.”
Senior Jessica Walker, graphic designer for the OOS, wanted to work for the office partly because of the programs they held.
“I was just interested in recycling and all the programs that they had been doing, and I wanted to learn more about sustainability, and so I thought this would be a great opportunity,” Walker said.
The OOS is focused on providing information as well as events.
“We are basically trying to inform the students on how they can be more sustainable,” Walker said. “Like recycling-wise—we have made posters and like info-graphics for them to learn what they can recycle and what not to recycle like on campus. I post a sustainable tips on our social media so that they can try and stay sustainable.”

EcoEagles

Formerly known as the Sustainability Club, the EcoEagles are also focused on education.
“We are kind of the student sustainability club here on campus,” fourth year student and one of two co-presidents for the club Jesse Johnson said. “Our goal is just to kind of educate more sustainability, create more sustainability with individual people; we’re trying to make it a fun social thing while also persuading and convincing more about sustainability.”
A few weeks back, the club held a vegetarian dinner and last quarter they held a panel in the library according to Johnson. He is hoping to “do one in agriculture this spring.”EcoEagles has been around since 2016; it was reactivated by alumna Emily Sherman and is still growing, according to Johnson.
With the club active once again, members will be heading out of town to learn more about sustainability practices.
“Right now we’re planning our itinerary to go to the Washington Oregon Higher Education Sustainability Conference,” Johnson said. “It’s in Seattle this year. We’ve got six people going—mostly officers—and then we have got two new people. It’s a really fun thing. A lot of fun talks. I’m kind of assigning everybody to go to this one event that talks about the future of sustainability jobs.”
The name EcoEagles is a recent change from the Sustainability Club, and was thought of by one of the club’s co-presidents.
“The reason why we had a name change is because there was a lot of confusion with people because we have a sustainability office so they assumed that was part of the sustainability club,” Johnson said. “So basically we changed it to avoid confusion. The EcoEagles is very catchy.”
Senior Trevor Burgess is the other EcoEagles’ co-president and is “just trying to get the name out there.”

Volunteering

Burgess would like to see the club fulfill one of its purposes and increase volunteering on campus.
“We have done volunteering and that’s something that I want to do more of. This year we haven’t set anything up like that, but we’ve worked with the Office of Community and Engagement before and the Lands Council to do Reforest Spokane Day,” Burgess said. “We’ve also provided volunteering opportunities in the campus garden which is being defunded. So no one will be employed for the garden. Definitely next quarter we will start reaching out more for that and we’re getting more volunteers.”

Sustainawhat?

Part of the reason students may not know about the sustainability effort at EWU is due to the distance of the office and the novelty of the club, according to Johnson.
“It’s kind of out of the way,” Johnson said. “The Office of Sustainability is up by the free parking lot. We’re a smaller thing. We don’t have as big of a budget as some clubs and we’re still new. Still trying to expand. We’re hoping to grow it this year.”
Sustainability Coordinator Erik Budsberg emphasized students’ busy schedules as a possible reason why students may not be as involved in sustainability on campus.
“People are just generally very busy. It’s tough as a student, you’re trying to get your classes. A lot of students we have on campus here hold a job outside of (school). So it’s about finding the time to get used to it,” Budsberg said. “There is sometimes this perception that sustainability is more of a west side of Washington idea while we’re over here on the east side … A lot of our students come from a rural background—at least to my understanding—the demographics haven’t been exposed to these kind of things or programs like composting or recycling. We’re being introduced to these things. So it’s kind of a new concept. It’s about not knowing what you don’t know.”

Getting Involved

There are a few options for students who want to become more eco-friendly according to Budsberg.
“I would say if you’re interested in just being engaged, there are the EcoEagles,” Budsberg said. “There is also the Alternative Energy Engineering club, if you’re like engineering focused … If you’re interested in an academic perspective, there are classes you can take. There is a sustainability minor … or if you are just kind of curious, you can just take Environmental Science 100.”•

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
About the Writer
Amanda Haworth, Chief Copy Editor

Amanda Haworth is The Easterner’s Chief Copy Editor. Haworth, a senior studying English Literature, grew up in western Washington and is in her second...

Leave a Comment

The Easterner reserves the right to edit or delete hate speech, inflammatory statements or vulgarities in comments. The Easterner also reserves the right to delete advertising from comments.

If you want a picture to show with your comment, go get a gravatar.




Navigate Left
  • Promoting sustainability at EWU

    Arts & Features

    Alpha Phi’s annual gala raising funds for women’s heart health

  • Promoting sustainability at EWU

    Arts & Features

    Theater seniors awarded prestigious trip to DC festival

  • Promoting sustainability at EWU

    Arts & Features

    EWU student groups host documentary viewing and panel discussion

  • Promoting sustainability at EWU

    Arts & Features

    “Field Research” displays art through everyday objects

  • Promoting sustainability at EWU

    Arts & Features

    Anton Chekov’s ‘The Seagull’ flies into the EWU theatre

  • Promoting sustainability at EWU

    Arts & Features

    History of Drag: LGBTQ rights, art and civil rights

  • Promoting sustainability at EWU

    Arts & Features

    No Man’s Land Film Festival returns to EWU

  • Promoting sustainability at EWU

    Arts & Features

    Episcopal, Lutheran, Methodist ministry partakes in Ashes to Go event

  • Promoting sustainability at EWU

    Arts & Features

    Harlem Nights Ball ends Black History Month at EWU

  • Promoting sustainability at EWU

    Arts & Features

    Looking Back: Rev. Jesse Jackson redefines identity

Navigate Right
The independent, student-run news site of Eastern Washington University.
Promoting sustainability at EWU